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Comparison and Contrast Literature
Mark Angelou Autobiographies and Alice Essays
Two prominent Afro-American writers are Maya Angelou and the walker. Even though the age of both ladies is almost iteration apart, their livelihoods are remarkably comparable. Each has written in their own autobiographies, Ms. Walker and Ms. Angelou, on their variance in the endogenous up in the south of rural countries (Bloom 60). Although they have similar life experiences, they all have a distinctive style that gives the audiences, with all of their frailty, abilities, hopes, and fears, the gift of their sumptuous humanity.
These two women at eight years of age were struck by tragedy. In one eye, Ms. Walker lost her eye. Angelou’s been raped. The incident was described as part of a larger piece. In her book In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens, Ms. Walker outlined her experience in the essay. As a segment, I know why the Caged Bird Sings, Miss Angelou told her story. Although they both wrote of their traumatic event, the manner in which the incident was recorded was distinct and appeared very different. Alice Walker tells the reader the facts in short phrases written today.
She chooses words that give her audience a strong emotional response. For example, Ms. Walker writes, that she is not in position to obtain weapons based on her gender. The term “relegated” makes the reader irritable and ridiculous (Cookson et al 800). I am instantly relegated to the role of Indian. Most people don’t like to be “relegated. Their explanation of meeting with her parents after the incident is a further example of Ms. Walker’s use of descriptive terms. She’s concerned about her parents’ being “confronted.” “Confronted” is a term of struggle. They want to start an attack when people are faced with others. The reader is conscious of the style and use of words that she is isolated and frightful. She’s left for her own fighting.
In a conversational tone, Maya Angelou tells her story. She uses the tense of the past to “it’s over” her audience. She is free of seriousness in her expressions. In the midst of sorrow, they encourage readers to see hope. Angelou summonses her spectators to communicate their opinions and emotional state instead of attempting to elicit a special emotional response. She refrains on her previous thought that she already died longtime ago. She, however, finds herself in a world of sensitization. The series of sentiments connects with those of his audience. Whilst Walker asks her parents how she met them, Angelou says, “she’s taken me in her arms and the fear is reduced for quite some time.” Sensitivity and consideration only exist. Again, the reader is invited. Walker wants to see the reader; Angelou wants to feel the audience with her. Via guiding the bibliophile’s focus to other feelings, they accomplish their objectives.
Alice Walker’s story is emotionally focused on rage, redness, and isolation. As I read this novel, not only with her devastating wound and the apparent dissociation of her family but also with Mrs. Walker herself, became lively. She never let go of it seemed to me. She seemed to take up her frustration instead. The anger of Ms. Angelou is subtle and short-lived, on the other hand.
The way that equally womenfolk refer to the penetrating physical ache suffered by each of them as little girls could not be discussed. Mrs. Walker describes her anguish little, but I felt it clearly. When I read, “When I read.” In my right eye, I feel an unbelievable blow. .”And my immediate reaction was, “My eye stiffs, and I cover it with my hand,” to cover my eye quickly with my hand (Walker 31). My body was responding to its discomfort.
Another effect was created by Ms. Angelou’s description. Then it was the pain, she wrote. A break and a step in when the senses are even torn away. “I felt a heart shaking instead of a physical reaction. Ms. Walker concentrated my attention on her body injury, while Ms. Angelou concentrated on her body scares.
My strongest expressive retort in both stories is one of unparalleled sorrow. Instead of the trauma of a child but also the devastating effects of the tragic event, loss of dignity, self-appreciation, and infancy alone, I was very sorry to see that sadness and desperation can ply over one heart. I wish I could comfort both of them. I did want to comfort her, b

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